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IS IT TIME FOR A “REALITY CHECK?”

by OPOVV, ©2013

The long-form birth certificate posted on the White House website has been determined to be a forgery by a criminal investigation which many are still ignoring

(Oct. 5, 2013) — In the 1800’s, the American Army cavalry in the Southwest communicated long distances by mirrors, weather permitting. Geronimo decoded the cipher and got hold of a couple of mirrors.  He would sit on top of a plateau and direct the soldiers this way, and then that way, and made a good sport of it all, much to the amusement of his tribe, the Chiricahua Apaches.

Many a skirmish and even battles have been lost due to poor or inaccurate communications. From Gettysburg to the Battle of the Bulge, crisp, precise and timely communication was the key to the success of an operation, be it military or in battle for a market share in the world economy. The same can be said in the music business, where two artists recorded the same song on the same day, but one was released a day before the other and that was the one that became a major hit (“Suspicion” by Terry Stafford vs. Elvis Presley). Or the patent for the telephone.

But even the best communication is worthless if it’s not on time, or, for that matter, never arrives. Before the internet, snail mail was the method that we used to contact one another. But what if a sailor asked his sweetheart to marry him before he left port, and she said she’d think about it and write to him?  Well, she thought about it and wrote him a letter with one word, YES! but he never got that letter because the mail plane crashed in fog or the supply ship that was to highline his letter over to his ship got sunk by a torpedo.

You have misunderstood communication, too. “Meet me at 9” can be morning or night. It’s a measurement of “12;” now is that centimeters or is that in inches?

So now we have communication that must be on time, accurate and easily understood, no ambiguities allowed. Misunderstanding a message, direction, or rule can have devastating consequences. Adding a chemical and water can lead to adding the water to the chemical rather than the chemical to the water, as every first-year chemistry student learns the hard way if he doesn’t pay attention.

The other night Sean Hannity had a group of college students on his program where he asked them about what they thought was going on in our country. Watching that show was the reason why I’m writing this editorial. The majority of these young people had absolutely not a clue of the facts that the rest of us have to deal with, such as the economy nose-diving, foreclosures and unemployment rising, more people on Food Stamps, Obamacare forcing Socialism down our throats, opening the doorway to Third World status with a military that does not want gays or lesbians in the ranks.

So now we have yet another ingredient added to “communication”: reality check. If the facts are ignored or the recipient is too dumb to accept the message, then no amount of accurate, timely and easily understood communication is worth anything. The current best example is that Obama has never been vetted, which means that the Birth Certificate that the White House released has been proven to be a fake, as in not real, illegal, a forgery submitted to commit fraud. That is a fact, an undeniable fact, yet these college students refuse to accept facts because it doesn’t fit into their warped utopian world view.

You want communication? Show the Obots the photos of the ovens at Dachau and patiently explain to them that if they continue to go through life with blinders on, this is their future and, because of their patent stupidity, the future for all of us.

OPOVV

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  1. The American Indians had another one over on us – they were excellent spellers … it’s real hard to correct a mis-spelled word in a smoke signal.