by Cheryl Lacey, ©2021 

(Oct. 9, 2021) — How do you intervene when there’s no clarity about what requires adjustment?

In Australia, we have fallen into this habit. We have become accustomed to ongoing intervention in school education – at federal, state, school and classroom levels.

The outcomes haven’t gone in our favour. Teaching and learning have become more stressful, less effective and more costly than any other time in our nation’s history.

One national intervention can change all this: the reintroduction of an agreed non-negotiable explicit curriculum.

What is an agreed non-negotiable explicit curriculum?

It includes:

·       Explicit statements on what must be taught and what is expected to be learned

·       Intervals for measuring teaching and learning.

Children are promoted for achieving the agreed standard and teachers are rewarded for their teaching performance.

This type of curriculum:

·       Leaves no room for error or misunderstanding

·       Ensures evidence of any genuine adjustments required if agreed standards have not been achieved or if they have been achieved sooner than expected.

Australia developed one of the world’s first free, compulsory, and secular education systems.

It promised a fair and equal opportunity for every child to belong, participate responsibly and strive toward personal goals in a healthy, safe, prosperous Australia. The primary feature of this system was an agreed non-negotiable explicit curriculum.

The reintroduction of an agreed non-negotiable explicit curriculum has great benefits for the education of Australia’s children. 

Four core subjects in this curriculum would be: English, Mathematics, Health and Physical Education and Western Civilisation.

The United States, while perhaps more disciplined in educational standards, would also do well to consider such a proposal.


Cheryl Lacey
e| cheryl@cheryllacey.com
w| www.cheryllacey.com
p| +61 419 518 811

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