by Ren Jander, J.D., ©2020

(Dec. 7, 2020) — Emperor Brian Kemp has joined the coup…of those attempting to overthrow the United States Supreme Court, specifically the well established precedent stating that the governor of a state, and its state constitution, are subordinate to that State’s Legislature, as ordered by Art. II, S. 1 of the Constitution of the United States, which assigns PLENARY authority to the Legislature in Georgia (and every other State) as to the choosing of Presidential Electors… “at any time,” before or after any election.

Emperor Kemp just released the following statement, which is so very wrong:
 
“While we understand four members of the Georgia Senate are requesting the convening of a special session of the General Assembly, doing this in order to select a separate slate of presidential electors is not an option that is allowed under state or federal law.”

That is absolutely reckless and despotic behavior by Kemp, considering the true unwavering precedent as announced in exact law laid down by the Supreme Court in three separate cases:

“‘Whatever provisions may be made by statute, or by the state constitution, to choose electors by the people, there is no doubt of the right of the legislature to resume the power at any time, for it can neither be taken away nor abdicated.’From this review, in which we have been assisted by the laborious research of counsel, and which might have been greatly expanded, it is seen that from the formation of the government until now the practical construction of the clause has conceded plenary power to the state legislatures in the matter of the appointment of electors.” McPherson v. Blacker, 146 U.S. 1, 35 (1892).

“This is the source for the statement in McPherson v. Blacker, 146 U.S. 1, 35 (1892), that the state legislature’s power to select the manner for appointing electors is plenary…” Bush v. Gore, 531 U.S. 98, 104 (2000).

“[E]ach State may appoint electors ‘in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct.’ Art. II, §1, cl. 2…This Court has described that clause as ‘conveying the broadest power of determination’ over who becomes an elector. McPhersonv.Blacker, 146 U.S. 1, 27 (1892)”.”  Chiafolo v. Washington, 591 US _ (2020)

Emperor Kemp is in violation of his oath to defend the Constitution of the United States against enemies both foreign and domestic.  I recall reading something somewhere about a long train of abuses.  Emperor Kemp is driving that train now, falling into the latter category of enemies acting in repugnance to the oath.  

Ren Jander, J.D.

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  1. SO ITS FINE THAT WE GET A PRESIDENT THAT; ONE; TAKES MONEY FROM CHINA, RUSSIA, AND WHO KNOW WHERE ELES YOU WOULD HAVE TO TRACK DOWN “”””””””””””””HUNTER””””””””””””” BUT A LAW ABIDING CIT. THAT DIDN’T TAKE ONE DIME FOR HIS SERVICE, AND TURNED OUR COUNTRY ABOUT, WELL THAT’S JUST FINE WITH YOU PEOPLE, ER!

  2. Not just Gov. Kemp even the legislators agree that since the legislature is recessed, the only way that could pass a resolution is in a special session called by the governor.

    Same thing was true in Arizona where some Republican legislators are calling for a special session.

    https://www.abc15.com/news/election-2020/could-arizona-lawmakers-change-the-fate-of-states-vote

    And in Pennsylvania.

    https://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2020/12/03/pa-gop-special-legislative-session/

    Clearly the legislators don’t believe they can on their own simply meet and vote on a resolution while not in session.

    1. Under what circumstances can a legislature determine electors? Only when it is in session? Cancel sessions before elections and don’t start them until after the inauguration. That will keep State legislatures out of it. Is it constitutional?

    2. Legislatures do not need permission from a governor to call a special session to review election laws and procedures. Otherwise the governors could impact legislatures ability to fulfill their constitutional duties and responsibilities, which would be inherently unconstitutional.