Former Trump Campaign Aide: Use of FBI Informant “Worst Possible Abuse of Power”

JUST HOW MANY “INFORMANTS” WERE THERE?

by Sharon Rondeau

(May 29, 2018) — On Tuesday’s “Hannity,” host Sean Hannity spoke with former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page, who wrote a column in The New York Post last week titled, “The FBI Ruined My Life.”

Warrant applications to surveil Page’s communications between October 2016 and September 2017 were obtained by FBI and DOJ high-ranking officials based on the infamous “dossier” compiled by former MI6 agent Christopher Steele.

It has been reported that the FISA court judges evaluating the applications were not informed that the dossier was paid for by the Clinton campaign and DNC and that its contents were unverified.

Page was approached by former Cambridge University professor Stefan Halper, a U.S. citizen who has reportedly provided information to the FBI and CIA, during a symposium in July 2016.  Halper also reportedly made contact with former Trump campaign co-chairman Sam Clovis and adviser George Papadopoulos, who pleaded “guilty” in October to lying to the FBI after being questioned as a result of the “Russia” investigation led by Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller, III.

According to CNN Wire, Papadopoulos could face up to five years in prison.

A second aide approached by Halper, Sam Clovis, went on to work in the Trump White House but said he departed several weeks ago in order to be able to speak freely about the Russia investigation.  “They’ve come at us in multiple directions,” Clovis said of Halper.  “This is the worst possible abuse of power.”

Former New York Trump campaign aide Michael Caputo claimed on Tuesday, as he has previously, that he was approached by a different individual who attempted to offer him access to an unknown number of Hillary Clinton’s missing emails, an offer he said he declined.

Clinton has admitted to having deleted 33,000 emails from her private server used during her time as Obama’s secretary of state.  Clinton claimed the deleted emails were strictly personal in nature.  In early July 2016, then-FBI Director James Comey gave a solo press conference in which he said that although Clinton was “extremely careless” in her handling of classified information, the FBI would not be recommending prosecution.

That decision and others, as well as recent revelations that the FBI apparently sent at least one “informant” to interact with Trump campaign members, has left many Americans’ faith in federal law-enforcement shaken.

Director of National Intelligence (DNI) James Clapper under Obama has said that neither he nor Obama had any knowledge of the use of the informant.

In recent days, The Daily Caller has been reporting that some FBI agents wish to come forward to testify to Congress about corruption within the agency but will do so only if they are subpoenaed because they do not believe that the federal whistleblower law will protect them. Some reportedly would opt not to appear for fear of retaliation by “FBI executives,” according to The DC on Monday.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.