Are The Roy Moore Alleged Victims Credible?

FIVE WOMEN ACCUSE U.S. SENATE CANDIDATE OF INAPPROPRIATE AND EGREGIOUS BEHAVIOR 38-40 YEARS AGO

by Sharon Rondeau

(Nov. 14, 2017) — On Monday afternoon, the fifth woman to accuse former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice and current Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexual misconduct gave a press conference in New York alongside California-based attorney Gloria Allred.

A well-known attorney with a national profile, Allred advised the DNC during the 2016 presidential election, accused Donald Trump of abusing women, has launched a fund for one of them, and was a delegate to the Democrat National Convention in July 2016.

On Thursday, The Washington Post reported that it had interviewed four women who accused Moore of improprieties ranging from kissing a teenage girl when he was 32 to gross misconduct with an alleged then-14-year-old.

One of the women, Deborah Wesson Gibson, had posted messages on her Facebook page opposing Trump and supportive of Doug Jones, Moore’s general-election opponent in the upcoming Alabama Senate race on December 12.  She had additionally worked for Hillary Clinton and former Vice President Joe Biden as a sign-language interpreter as evidenced by photos she posted on Facebook.

After The Post’s story was published and scrutiny was applied to her public postings, many of them were removed, as Breitbart reported on Friday.

Another accuser, Leigh Corfman, claimed that Moore called her when she was 14 “on her phone in her bedroom,” but Corfman’s mother stated that her daughter did not have a phone in her bedroom at the time.

The latest accuser, Beverly Young Nelson, said that Moore assaulted her and left her on the ground after offering her a ride home on a cold night when her boyfriend, who reportedly had “a violent temper,” was allegedly late to arrive.

Although at least one report said that Moore did not respond to Nelson’s accusations, AL.com reported on Monday night that Moore said, “I never did what she said I did. I don’t even know the woman. I don’t know anything about her.”

In regard to The Post’s report, Moore said that he remembered at least two of the women through their parents but denied providing alcohol to one of them, who would have reportedly been under the legal drinking age at the time.

Moore told Sean Hannity on his radio show on Friday that the county where the woman alleged he bought her a drink is “a dry county.”

On Monday evening, a Twitter user posted a Yelp business listing for the Old Hickory House, where Nelson said she was working as a waitress when Moore allegedly flirted with her and then assaulted her after offering her a ride home.

AL.com spelled the restaurant’s name as “Old Hickory House” in one article and “Olde Hickory House” in another.

During Monday afternoon’s presser, Allred opened an alleged high school yearbook containing an inscription said to be written by Roy Moore three days before Christmas in 1977, wherein the name of the restaurant is printed “Olde Hickory House” underneath Moore’s name written in cursive.

The inscription was signed “Roy Moore D.A.” Quoting writer Thomas Wictor, The Gateway Pundit pointed out that Moore’s biography states that he was an assistant district attorney in 1977, not a “D.A.”

It is unclear why a 16-year-old would have had a high school yearbook in her possession at her place of employment and if she were not in that year’s graduating class.

The book was reportedly in circulation in December rather than at the end of the school year, when yearbooks customarily are distributed.  Why Nelson might have asked Moore to sign it is an open question.

During the press conference, Nelson said that Moore was in the restaurant every night, but Moore said in response, “I don’t even know where the restaurant is or was.”

The mainstream media is not focusing the same amount of time on the trial of Democrat U.S. Senator Robert Menendez, who is accused of accepting bribes to advocate for the business interests of his longtime acquaintance, Florida opthalmologist Salomon Melgen.  According to the U.S. Justice Department in 2015, Menendez and Melgen sought out underage young women in the Dominican Republic.

In late April, Melgen was convicted on 67 counts of Medicare fraud.

Late on Monday morning, Moore’s wife, Kayla Moore, wrote on her Facebook page that “we are gathering evidence of money being paid to people who would come forward. Which is part of why we are filing suit!”

Beginning on Saturday, Moore had promised a lawsuit would be filed against The Post, presumably for defamation.  Federal law states that public figures must prove that the defendant published statements which were known to be false, which is a higher standard than that which private citizens must meet.

The full press conference can be viewed here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Responses to "Are The Roy Moore Alleged Victims Credible?"

  1. Ed Sunderland   Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 11:44 AM

    40 years ago? Really? We all know why this is being flashed in front of us today and by republicans as well who are traitors for spinelessly giving Barack Obama/Soetoro everything he wanted when he was in office then shamelessly lying to the base (that would be us) by writing useless bills to kill Obamacare that they knew would fail.None of these dolts deserve any respect they haven’t earned any except for a handful.

    The fix is in and we need to replace the fixers in the RNC.

  2. Mark Bellison   Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 11:28 AM

    Here are some of the residents of Gadsden, Alabama discussing Moore’s interest in young girls.

    http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/11/gadsden_residents_say_moores_b.html

  3. Bob68   Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 9:11 AM

    Moore did not do himself any good in his interview with Hannity a few days ago. His kinda, sorta, but not quite denial seemed contrived to me.
    How about asking Moore and his accusers to take a lie detector test?

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