How the Media Twists Facts to Enforce Its Propaganda Bias

“A COMMON TACTIC”

by Tom DeWeese, ©2017, American Policy Center

(Nov. 2, 2017) — It’s become obvious that our fight against Agenda 21/2030 is beginning to have an affect when a reporter writes not one, but two attack articles about the same event. That’s what happened as a result of my recent talk in Rexburg, Idaho.

In mid-October I traveled to three cities in Idaho (including Rexburg) and to Spokane, Washington, speaking about Agenda 21 and the growing assault on private property and individual choice. Below is one of two reports on the Rexburg event, as reported by reporter Bryan Clark. I’ve inserted my remarks in the body of his article to show what I actually said in contrast to his innuendos and lack of facts.

Conspiracist warns of plot for global domination

Posted: October 19, 2017 5:31 p.m.

By BRYAN CLARK, Post Register

His original article is in blue 

REXBURG — Most people don’t think concentration camps and bike paths have much in common, but Tom DeWeese sees a connection. He sees lots of connections. Everywhere.

Of course, I never mentioned concentration camps in my talk. For that matter I didn’t mention FEMA camps or chemtrails either.

DeWeese is one of the nation’s most prominent exponents of the Agenda 21 conspiracy theory, which has gained increasing traction among Idaho’s far right, being recently invoked in the debate over proposed wildlife overpasses near Island Park.

Of course, using terms like “conspiracy theory” and “far right” are a direct attempt to bias the reader from the start. It’s a common tactic in political advocacy, but has no place in legitimate journalism. In truth, I actually spent considerable time at the beginning of my talk producing official government documents showing that specific government programs clearly claimed to be implementation of Agenda 21. Each of these documents used the exact same description for the purpose of Agenda 21 as a “comprehensive blueprint” with the intention of reorganizing human society.

Here are my exact words as I held up each document:

In 1994, the American Planning Association (one of the largest and most respected planning groups in the nation) put out a newsletter calling Agenda 21 a Comprehensive Blueprint for Sustainable Development that was adopted at the recent UNCED conference in Rio de Janeiro (the Earth Summit).

In 1997 the United States issued a 70-page report to the United Nations Department for Policy Coordination and Sustainable Development, detailing the progress the US was making to implement Agenda 21. The second chapter of that report is titled “International cooperation to accelerate sustainable development in developing countries and related domestic policies.”

In 1998, the Federal Register issued a report on the EPA’s Challenge Grant Program. That report says, “The EPA’s Challenge Grant Program is also implementation of Agenda 21.”

In 2011, the EPA issued a revised report entitled “History of Sustainability.” It details how EPA policy on Sustainability was developed. The Fifth item on that report is Agenda 21, calling it a “comprehensive process of planning and action to attain sustainability.”

And on and on it went, about Agenda 21. The blueprint. The plan. The consensus. The direction for changing how people live. Here was the plan for the 21st Century!

Of course, my point in bringing out these official documents was to show their excitement, support, and determination to impose this “plan to reorganize human society” domestically and worldwide. Again – that was the entire point of my presentation.

Read the rest here.

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