The Makings of a Government False Flag Operation pb

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by Sharon Rondeau

Who has caught who committing a crime?

(Dec. 24, 2012) — On December 21, 2012, LCDR Walter Francis Fitzpatrick, III (Ret.) and your editor were guests on the Laurie Roth Show discussing the events of April 20, 2010 in Madisonville, TN which have now been proved to have been a “false flag” operation carried out by the federal government and specifically, the FBI.

The FBI is a division of the U.S. Department of Justice, presently headed by Eric Holder.  Holder had testified to Congress that he knew nothing of the “Fast & Furious” gunwalking operation until the summer of 2011, but evidence shows that it had commenced in 2009.  The failed program killed Border Agent Brian Terry, several hundred Mexican citizens, and possibly other Americans.  Rep. Darrell Issa, chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee, believes that Fast & Furious was devised to “limit Second Amendment rights.”

Holder had failed to respond to a subpoena issued by Issa’s committee in October 2011 and was found in civil and criminal contempt of Congress in June of this year.  Issa is now under subpoena to appear at a hearing challenging the Electoral College vote certification filed by Atty. Orly Taitz of California which claims that Barack Hussein Obama is using a false identity, including forged birth certificates and a stolen Social Security number.

On April 1, 2010, Fitzpatrick had attempted to carry out a citizen’s arrest on Gary Pettway, the acting Monroe County grand jury foreman, after discovering that Pettway had been serving in the position for more than 20 years.  It was later confirmed that Pettway had been installed for more than 28 years and that county criminal courts had been outlawed by the Tennessee legislature in 1984.

After filing a criminal complaint of treason against Barack Hussein Obama on March 17, 2009 with two federal grand juries in Knoxville and with the U.S. District Court in Washington, DC, Fitzpatrick attempted to appear in front of his local grand jury, which was also obstructed in the late fall of 2009.  Closer scrutiny of Pettway’s role and the way in which his complaint was handled by the judiciary belied years of unchecked corruption which the Tennessee legislature and governor have refused to tackle in a meaningful way.

Following the citizen’s arrest, Fitzpatrick was scheduled for an assignment hearing on April 20, 2010.  Unbeknownst to him and those who traveled to Madisonville in support of Fitzpatrick that day, one “William L. Bryan” had alerted the FBI that Fitzpatrick and others were members of a “militia” which was planning to carry out acts of violence that day.  Consequently, Monroe County jail inmates set up pole cameras on April 19, and on the following day, as many as 200 officers including FBI, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI), local police, county sheriffs’ deputies from at least four counties, and a SWAT team were deployed to Madisonville.  Schools and banks were closed and entrances and exits to the courthouse were occupied by Tennessee Highway Patrolmen.

Through an affidavit signed by FBI Special Agent Mark van Balen, the government claimed that violence had been planned by virtue of the fact that another official had allegedly sighted several people and as many as a dozen carrying guns in the area of the courthouse.  However, the names of those allegedly armed were never produced, there were no arrests or incidents, and most of those who arrived to observe the hearing were turned away by deputies armed with semi-automatic weapons inside the courthouse.

Bryan’s false report resulted in the wide dissemination of propaganda and the ultimate arrest and conviction of Darren Wesley Huff, who is currently serving a four-hear prison sentence for a crime he did not commit.  The Post & Email has been told that Huff plans to appeal his conviction.

Monroe County is part of the Tenth Judicial District of Tennessee, which Tennessee Attorney General Robert E. Cooper, Jr. announced was under investigation for alleged prosecutorial misconduct in late August.  At least three witnesses who testified against Huff were identified as targets of the probe, including District Attorney General R. Steven Bebb.  Other citizens in the district have taken legal action against Bebb and what appears to be a criminal enterprise operating within the district.

Huff had traveled to Madisonville early on April 20 and had been stopped for allegedly failing to observe a stop sign, something Huff contests.  Members of the Tennessee Highway Patrol asked to search his truck but did not possess a warrant.  Huff, who told the officers that he was legally armed and showed them his firearms permits, then invoked his Fourth Amendment rights and politely declined the search.  After approximately 90 minutes of conversation, Huff was allowed to proceed to Madisonville with the suggestion that he lock up his firearms upon his arrival.  However, Huff locked them in his exterior toolbox in front of the officers, then drove to town.

Huff was one of those disallowed from entering the courtroom to hear the proceedings involving Fitzpatrick.  He went to a nearby restaurant, had lunch with some of the other travelers who also were barred from attending, then went home uneventfully.  Ten days later, he was arrested on two federal firearms charges involving an obscure law which had never been prosecuted.

At the end of October, Fitzpatrick asked Special Agent Sandra Bungo of the Washington, DC FBI office to review documentation on the April 20 law enforcement deployment and subsequent arrest of Darren Huff without any evidence.  Bungo promised to look into the matter, but on December 20, she informed Fitzpatrick that she did not find evidence of misconduct on the part of FBI agents as it went to April 20, 2010 or the arrest and conviction of Darren Huff.  In a formal letter in which she referred to Fitzpatrick as “William,” Bungo stated:

The IPU/INSD has reviewed your allegations and has determined that this matter does not warrant the initiation of an administrative investigation in that there is no evidence of FBI misconduct…Therefore, no further action will be taken by this office.

In an email response, Bungo had referred to “documentation” which she had reviewed and relied upon to arrive at her decision.

In late March of this year, The Post & Email submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for documentation on the alleged “courthouse takeover” in Madisonville on April 20, 2010, including documentation of which authority ordered the unusual deployment of police and federal agents.  In a letter dated April 25, 2012, we were informed by the FBI that “We were unable to identify main file records responsive to the FOIA.”  However, after filing an appeal on May 1, we were told by the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Information Policy that documentation existed but that releasing it would constitute an “unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.”  The letter from OIP, dated September 21, 2012, states, in part:

I am affirming, on modified grounds, the FBI’s action on your request.  Without consent, proof of death, official acknowledgment of an investigation, or an overriding public interest, disclosure of law enforcement records concerning an individual could reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.

The letter is signed by someone perhaps with the last name of “O’Neill” for an “Anne D. Work, Senior Counsel, Administrative Appeals Staff.”  The FBI stated that there were no records responsive to our request; the OIP stated that such records exist but that it “affirms the FBI action” on the request.

Special Agent Sandra Bungo has now stated that she has reviewed documentation of the April 20, 2010 event and finds no evidence of wrongdoing on the part of FBI agents.

On May 22, 2012 one week after Huff’s sentencing in a radio series called “Gotcha,” FBI Special Agent Scott Johnson told host and FBI employee Mollie Halpern that “This case is monumental to the FBI because it will set precedent for case law in future domestic terrorism cases throughout the United States.”

Both Huff and Fitzpatrick have been termedSovereign Citizens” in hit pieces put out by the mainstream media and the government itself.  Both were prosecuted by Monroe County, which has been proven to be operating a criminal government.

The Obama regime has indicated a preference for strict gun control laws in the wake of several recent shootings, most notably, the attack by an alleged lone gunman on an elementary school in Connecticut which killed 26 teachers and first-graders.  Through media outlets such as TIME Magazine, the regime has labeled many military veterans, particularly white Christians, as “sovereign citizens” and “militia members.”

On December 20, The Post & Email contacted Sandra Bungo with the following message:

Good morning, Special Agent Bungo, I am owner and editor of The Post & Email, an electronic newspaper which focuses on corruption in government.  My publication has been following the cases of Walter Francis Fitzpatrick, III and Darren Wesley Huff for more than three years.

I am aware that Walter Francis Fitzpatrick, III lodged a complaint with your division to request an independent review of the events of April 20, 2010 in Madisonville, TN, on which 100-200 law enforcement personnel were deployed to prevent a “courthouse takeover” as reported in many mainstream media outlets.  I have also been informed that you have made a decision not to launch an internal investigation into whether or not the FBI acted properly in regard to that event.

Special Agent Mark van Balen stated in an affidavit which contained an incorrect date of April 2, 2010, when it should have been April 1, 2010, that at least “a dozen” people were carrying firearms around the courthouse that day.  Yet, no one has been identified as having been one of the “dozen,” nor any charges brought, except against Darren Huff, who did not commit a crime.  Where did the FBI obtain the information that a “courthouse takeover” had been planned?  Where is the evidence?  It was found that Huff had a permit for the “pistol on his hip,” and Tennessee is an open-carry state, for that matter, so where did he break the law?

The Associated Press and other outlets never showed any “citizens’ arrest warrants” in their reporting, and there were none in connection with the April 20 arraignment date.  It has also been proved that the grand jury foreman had been acting illegally in his capacity, having served more than 28 years without even an appointing order:

Special Agent Scott Johnson told Mollie Halpern that the Huff conviction “will set precedent for case law in future domestic terrorism cases throughout the United States.”  It was not revealed that Huff had been labeled a “Sovereign Citizen” in law enforcement training materials circulated prior to his trial in October 2011 until after he was convicted, materials which the government of Tennessee has gone to great lengths to conceal from the media and therefore the public:

It is interesting that you told Fitzpatrick that you have reviewed documentation of the events, yet the Department of Justice initially told me that no documentation existed after I filed a FOIA request last March on the matter and continues to stonewall my attempt to obtain it:

You are most likely aware that there is a vast amount of corruption within the Tenth Judicial District of Tennessee

and that the prosecutors there are allegedly under investigation by the Tennessee Attorney General:  Whether or not an actual investigation is going forward is an open question.  However, prosecutors have been known to lie under oath, and judges routinely break the law by stacking juries and making law from the bench.  In the case of April 20, people had traveled from many areas to witness Fitzpatrick’s arraignment but were not allowed to enter the courtroom because deputies with assault weapons blocked their entrance.  Darren Huff was one of those people and ended up having lunch at a nearby restaurant, then returned peacefully home.  On what grounds, then, was he arrested and put in federal prison, and what part did the Knoxville FBI play in those events?

A citizen’s arrest is also legal in Tennessee, and the Tennessee constitution states that “All power is inherent in the people.”
If the government is acting criminally, why can a person not conduct a peaceful citizen’s arrest?

The person who allegedly called in the threat of a “courthouse takeover” has never been questioned, as far as we know:  Why not, when his report turned out to be false?  Martha Stewart went to prison for allegedly lying to the FBI.

Government employees, including those working for the FBI, are paid for with taxpayer dollars.  Should the FBI, then, not be accountable to the people they serve?  While I understand the necessity of confidentiality in your investigations of crime, the FBI should be open and honest about its own conduct for the sake of “transparency.”

I will appreciate it if you can respond to my questions on the record.

Thank you very much.

Sharon Rondeau, Editor
The Post & Email
P.O. Box 195
Stafford Springs, CT  06076]

We have not received a response from Bungo.  Our administrative appeal has moved to a second level which can accompany a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court for the documentation requested by the FOIA.

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