Why is the U.S. Supporting Egypt’s Mohamed Morsi?

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by Sharon Rondeau

The city of Cairo has been the scene of recent violent protests against Mohamed Morsi, who was reportedly elected president after the deposing of Hosni Mubarak in 2011. Morsi recently pushed through a new constitution which many in the North African nation see as Islamic in nature.

(Jan. 29, 2013) — After riots occurred over the weekend in several key cities, Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi declared martial law throughout the country and granted the army the authority to arrest civilians.

Morsi’s top general, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, said that the unrest in the country could lead to chaos and collapse.

On Tuesday, the Minister of the Interior, which oversees security for the country, reported that peaceful protesters have been “infiltrated” by those wishing to cause violence “through violent confrontations with security forces.”  Protesters have been beaten by police in some instances.

Last week, the Obama regime began transferring M-16 fighter jets to the Morsi regime, then condemned the recent violence there, calling it “unacceptable.”

On Friday, protests against Morsi and his ties to The Muslim Brotherhood resulted in the shooting deaths of five people in Suez, including a security officer.  Offices of The Muslim Brotherhood have been set aflame, and street fighting has been reported.  Protesters have fought with police, who disbursed tear gas as they attempted to break through barbed wire outside of Morsi’s presidential palace.

On Saturday, a group of protesters attempted to break into a prison where 21 people were sent after having been convicted of the murders of 74 people in a football stadium on February 1 of last year.  Those convicted were sentenced to death.

On Tuesday, Morsi lifted a curfew which had been placed on Suez, Ismalia and Port Said, where violent clashes between protesters and police had occurred over the weekend.  Port Said has declared independence from Egypt, and Cairo is reportedly still in chaos. Numerous protestors refused to observe the curfew and enter into a dialogue with Morsi.

Similar uprisings have been reported since early December after Morsi attempted to seize new powers not granted to him by the constitution then in operation.

Masked men describing themselves as members of a group named the “Black Bloc” have been called “a militia” by members of The Muslim Brotherhood.

The Morsi regime has been accused of Christian repression, incarceration and murder and is labeled by some Christians as an “Islamist dictatorship.”  On January 18, 2013, a writer for the Catholic Herald said:

…Morsi’s real agenda unfolds before the Western world’s horrified gaze, causing many to wonder if Egypt really wasn’t a lot better off under the tender mercies of Hosni Mubarak. Morsi has refused to take any action against the rising violence against the Copts (10 per cent, don’t forget, of Egypt’s population).

Two years ago, the “Arab Spring” began in Tunisia and spread to several Middle Eastern countries, purportedly to protest decades of dictatorial rule and begin a transition to “democracy.”  The protests were supported by Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.  In an article dated December 17, 2011, a year after the protests began, NPR reported that Egypt was considered “a victory” for forcing the resignation of Hosni Mubarak. Though friendly to Israel and the United States, Mubarak was reported to have been “a cautious, heavy-handed ruler.”

Following the Arab Spring protests, Obama had lauded Middle Easterners at the United Nations who had “demanded their universal rights” through “the moral force of non-violence.”

A top aide to Morsi in charge of state-run media has stated that the Holocaust is a “myth” perpetrated by the United States.  Morsi has called the Jewish people “descendants of apes and pigs.”  In a recent meeting with U.S. senators, Morsi claimed that the Jews mischaracterized his remarks.

In 2008, The Los Angeles Times would not allow a video of a dinner attended by Obama and Rashid Khalidi to be aired during which it is believed that Khalidi, who is a Columbia University professor, former member of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and supporter of the Arab Spring, expressed criticism of the U.S.-Israel relationship and Israel’s purported “terrorism” carried out against Palestinians.  Obama has downplayed his relationship with Khalidi as he has with Bill Ayers, former domestic terrorist; Rev. Jeremiah Wright, former pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago; and Valerie Jarrett, now a senior Obama adviser but previous negligent Chicago property manager and board member.

NBC News, which portrays Obama favorably rather than objectively, has described Jarrett as “a Chicago lawyer, fundraiser, and former city hall official.”  Jarrett was born in Iran.

By sending the fighter jets and Abrams tanks to Egypt, Obama has been accused of “arming the enemy.”

It has also been reported that Obama has armed Al Qaeda in Libya and Syria.  Al Qaeda planned and carried out attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001 which killed nearly 3,000 people.  Obama has been called out for treason on numerous occasions by a retired member of the U.S. military and others, but the active military, Congress, Secret Service, FBI and other national security agencies have refused to take action to remove him from office or charge him with a crime.

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