What Really Happened on April 20, 2010 in Madisonville, TN?

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by Sharon Rondeau

Slide from “Sovereign Citizen” Training Program featuring Darren Huff and Walter Francis Fitzpatrick, III.  Is Darren Huff really a “domestic terrorist,” or was he a scapegoat for a massive deployment of resources which came up empty-handed?

(Aug. 19, 2012) — Since its inception in three years ago, The Post & Email has been reporting on evidence pointing to fraud, forgery, identity fraud and cover-ups perpetrated by Barack Hussein Obama and his criminal assistants in Hawaii, within the federal government, the courts, Congress, and on the part of Obama staffers and acquaintances who lie to the public on a routine basis.

Beginning in April 2010, The Post & Email began focusing on government corruption in Monroe County, TN and later, the state of Tennessee as a whole.  At the time, we did not necessarily believe there was a direct correlation between the deep-seated corruption in eastern Tennessee and that of the Obama regime, but mounting evidence suggests that Walter Francis Fitzpatrick, III, who filed the first criminal complaint of treason against Barack Hussein Obama, has become the target of local, state and federal officials in a retaliatory capacity, beginning with his small community in Tennessee.

On April 30, 2010, Darren Huff was arrested ten days after he traveled to Madisonville, TN to attend a court hearing for Walter Francis Fitzpatrick, III.  Both Navy veterans were depicted in local and national media outlets as “extremists” who had planned to “take over the courthouse” by committing violent acts in Monroe County, TN on April 20.

The Post & Email has spoken to several eyewitnesses who attempted to attend Fitzpatrick’s hearing on the 20th but were prevented from entering the courthouse by armed sheriff’s deputies, who were among approximately 100 police officers deployed into Madisonville because of an alleged tip from someone who had warned of a violent attack planned which would culminate in the alleged “courthouse takeover.”

The Southern Poverty Law Center states the following about Darren Huff:

April 30, 2010
Darren Huff, an Oath Keeper from Georgia, is arrested and charged with planning the armed takeover of a Madisonville, Tenn., courthouse and “arrest” of 24 local, state and federal officials. Authorities say Huff was angry about the April 1 arrest there of Walter Francis Fitzpatrick III, a leader of the far-right American Grand Jury movement that seeks to have grand juries indict President Obama for treason. Several others in the antigovernment “Patriot” movement accuse Huff of white supremacist and anti-Semitic attitudes in Internet postings. He is sentenced in May 2012 to four years in federal prison.

Last year, Huff and Fitzpatrick were featured in a nationally-circulated law enforcement instructional program designed to familiarize local police with the “Sovereign Citizen” movement allegedly comprising individuals who did not believe they had to pay taxes, register their vehicles, and who harbored “anti-government” sentiments and were possibly capable of violence, particularly against police officers.  The training program was designed with input from the Southern Poverty Law Center.

One section of the “Sovereign Citizen” program contained a Power Point slide on “Birthers,” who were described as those doubting that “President Obama” was “born in Hawaii” and the authenticity of his short-form birth certificate pictured on its own Power Point slide.

The authenticity of both Obama’s short-form and long-form birth certificates has been declared to be non-existent by some analysts and a law enforcement investigative team from Maricopa County, AZ. An attorney who claims that the Social Security number Obama is using is fraudulent has attempted to gain access to his original application form but was denied access on the grounds of “privacy.”  The private investigator who first declared the number a forgery has filed her own lawsuit to enjoin the Ohio Secretary of State from placing Obama’s name on the state ballot until the number he is using is validated.

Many discussions on Obama’s questionable constitutional eligibility to serve as president have now shifted to crimes he might have committed, including leaks of national security information, identity fraud, possibly participating in the selling of his Senate seat vacated after he allegedly won the 2008 election, and multi-million-dollar loans to companies which were known to lack solvency but whose executives had raised money for Obama during the campaign.  There is also the open question as to why Obama claimed executive privilege to keep secret documentation requested by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee concerning Fast & Furious, which allowed guns to “walk” to criminals who then committed murders with them, including that of a U.S. Border Patrol agent and an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent.

An official law enforcement investigation into a more detailed “birth certificate” released but not pictured in the training program revealed that that image, placed on the White House website and presented on television to the public, is considered “definitely fraudulent.”

Are such people as Pat Boone, Joseph Farah, Jeffrey Kuhner of The Washington Times, and a prominent county sheriff considered “domestic terrorists” because they have doubts about the image which has been officially declared a forgery?  Saul Alinksy, in his Rules for Radicals, stated that it was important to “Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it.”

An Associated Press article reporting on the fatal, tragic killing of two sheriff’s deputies and the injury of two more in Louisiana classifies the perpetrators as “heavily armed adherents to an ideology known as the ‘sovereign citizens’ movement.”

Is there, in reality, such a “movement,” or are instances of people murdering police officers solated?  Who has determined that there is such a “movement,” and are such individuals actually “networked?”

The Federal Bureau of Investigation, which reports to and appears to glean most of its information from, the U.S. Department of Justice about “sovereign citizens,” considers them potential domestic terrorists.  The FBI states that indications that a person might be a “sovereign citizen” are if he or she makes “References to the Bible, The Constitution of the United States, U.S. Supreme Court decisions…”

Since when did those quoting from the Bible, U.S. Constitution and Supreme Court decisions become “a domestic terrorist movement?”  Was Huff labeled a “sovereign citizen” in a federal training program echoing the information on the FBI’s website prior to his trial in order to sway public opinion to obtain a conviction?  Does the label hearken back to Obama’s 2008 campaign identifying “bitter clingers” to “guns and religion?”  Does Obama insult such people but covet their vote for the upcoming election?

The Department of Homeland Security 2009 report on “rightwing extremism” states that individuals to be watched often rejecting government authority.  However, Fitzpatrick and Huff have stated that they oppose government corruption, not the government itself.  In a recent interview with Fitzpatrick, he told The Post & Email, “I am the government.  I served for 25 years in uniform.  I am anti-government-corruption, not anti-government.”

Were the Founding Fathers “sovereign citizens?”  Evidently so, as they launched a nation be declaring independence from Great Britain, which had raised taxes on the American colonists, closed the Port of Boston following the Boston Tea Party as part of the Coercive Acts, passed the Intolerable Acts, and required the colonists to give refuge to British soldiers.  When the Declaration of Independence was signed and a new nation born, the Founders included the Third Amendment to the Bill of Rights, which guaranteed that a property owner had to give his consent before “quartering” a soldier.

Is the Obama regime attempting to marginalize, in Alinsky style, those who revere and cherish what the Founding Fathers gave us in the form of self-government never before seen in the history of the world?

Are grievances similar to those identified by the Founders oppressing the nation? the state of Tennessee? Monroe County?

The Department of Homeland Security’s 2009 report claimed that “returning veterans” are recruitment targets of right-wing extremists because of their military skills.  Darren Huff and Walter Francis Fitzpatrick, III are both veterans of the U.S. Navy and familiar with firearms, although neither has used one in an act of violence.

An individual who attended the assignment hearing for Fitzpatrick on April 20, 2010 reported:

When I came to town, I noticed several cars in the area, but walking into the courthouse – there were three of us – and that was it.  We walked in, we were told that the hearing was down at the other courthouse.  So we went over there, and when we walked up, we noticed a crowd of people there, and we were told that we couldn’t come in because the hearing was closed to the public.  So we stood outside and waited for a while.  There was a big crowd of people outside; that stood out in my mind.  There were some officials in the area, but other than that, we were just biding our time waiting for Walt to come out so we could talk with him.  We were under the impression that we would be able to hear the proceedings, but that did not happen, which was surprising.  Some people came from great distances to be there.  It was a little disconcerting, but we were there to support Walt, regardless.  So we waited until he was finished.  It probably took about an hour and a half; there was a bit of a wait there.

Finally, we got word that he was heading up to the cafe – Donna’s – so we went up there, and we saw Walt and visited with him.  We asked him how he was doing, and we all went inside the cafe to get something to eat.  Walt seemed to be in good spirits, and we sat and listened to him discuss what had happened.  From there, we sat and prayed and offered support, and he thanked us for making the trip there to support him.  He’s a good man.

When we were gathering up our items and getting ready to leave, somebody pointed out that our vehicles had been filmed.  I don’t know what the reason was for that.

Other than that, which I didn’t observe, nothing out of the ordinary happened in my eyes, and the people we met with were all very supportive and concerned for Walt and with justice.

The Post & Email asked, “What kind of police presence did you notice that day?”

I noticed some uniformed policemen, and when we walked into the courthouse where the hearing was supposed to take place, there were armed guards.  I was surprised to see that.  When we were told that the hearing was not in that building and had been moved to the other location, we turned around and said, “OK.”  That was a bit unusual, I thought.

“Were there a lot of people trying to get in to observe the hearing?”

There were many people down at the other location, and there were some uniformed policemen.

Let me relate an experience that happened prior to our getting into town:  I received a call from Carl Swensson, and he told me that they were in Sweetwater and had been stopped by the police.  Darren Huff was with him, and Carl said, “We could be an hour and a half.”  He said they had run into a “little problem” and were being detained and were hoping to be into town fairly shortly.  When we saw him after they made it to town, he and Darren told how they had been detained, and they apologized for being so late in getting there.  We were a bit baffled by that, those of us who were there for the hearing.  We expressed concern that they were OK and they assured us they were fine but that Darren had been questioned and his car had been search.  He said that they were coming to town to support Walt; that was the reason for coming to town.  So one wonders if they were expecting something bigger as a result of our being there.  The group of people who did attend were people who care very much about the country and wanted to show support for Walt, and that was it.

“Did you notice anything unusual about Madisonville or Monroe County?”

The fact that there were many policemen seemed odd.  Not being from that part of the country, maybe that’s what they do…

“Did you feel intimidated at all when you went into the first courthouse?  Were people friendly?”

They were not friendly, and it was intimidating.

The interviewee stated that he or she was audited by the IRS following the trip to Madisonville.  When The Post & Email asked if it was intimidating experience, the response was, “No, but the irony of it was that it went back four years to when we had lived in another state.”

When The Post & Email asked, “Do you think it was because you were in Madionsville that day?” the response was:

We had been audited before, although I think it was unrelated.  I think this time was because I was there.  When one looks at the year of the audit, the year they went back to, it seemed rather peculiar.  It gave me the feeling that it was a little more than appeared on the surface.

“Was anything wrong on the drive home?”

Yes.  When I was going through a particular state, I stopped to get gasoline.  When I got out of my car, a man pulled up in a truck, and he was honking and waving and yelling at me to say “hello.”  That was interesting, and I smiled, and as soon as I finished filling up, I went into the store to get some coffee and pay my bill, and I noticed he was standing up the counter looking around, and it seemed it was for me.  I kind-of stepped back and didn’t want him to see me.  So he paid his bill and walked out.  Then, when I finished paying for my bill, I walked to my car, which I had pulled up right in front of the store – and he had pulled up next to me in his truck – so I cracked the passenger window and said “hello.”  He had a very dynamic personality and smiling, friendly – and he said, “Has anyone ever told you that you look like (name of actor/actress)?”  I hear this a lot, so right away I said, “Well, yes, sometimes I hear that,” and he started going into movies and love…

Finally, after five minutes, I put my window up and said, “I need to go; take care.”  I pulled out of the parking lot, and he pulled up behind me.  I took a left to go onto the road that then takes a right to go onto the interstate.  he took a right away from me.  As soon as I got to the ramp to the interstate, he had turned around and was following me.  So I just gunned it.  He wasn’t traveling fast, as though he was just sauntering down the road.  I found that very unsettling.

I felt that it was intentional, because there is no way…how would he have known who I looked like without having known what I looked like, having seen a picture or video of me?  I had never seen him, and I didn’t see him on the interstate when I pulled off to get gas; just out of the blue, there he was.  He was very polished in his demeanor and in the way he talked.  He looked like somebody who had a nice career, as if he was retired, but not elderly.

“How was he dressed?”

I don’t recall much, only that he wasn’t wearing a suit.  He was in casual dress.

In order for someone to remark about my appearance, they would have had to have seen me.  For somebody to pull up alongside me and start honking and waving I found very odd.  I had been wearing sunglasses, so how could he see my face to know what I look like?  I get the feeling that he was dispatched by someone, although there is no way to conclusively prove that.

“Was there anything else that you thought was strange or out of place after that?”

I’ve had a couple of encounters with a local county sheriff.  The most recent was one afternoon in December, I noticed a sheriff’s car pointed at our house with fog lights on.  He sat there for at least five minutes.  When he left, he backed up and put his flashers on.  But when I watched hm drive around the road on the lake, I  didn’t see the flashers anymore.  He turned them off.  I found that odd, because I’ve had a few other encounters with sheriffs this year.  I went down the next day to talk to the sheriff’s department to ask them if there was anything going on in the area.  When I drove by an area where sometimes the sheriff sits in his vehicle, he was there, abnd I turned around, and I came back and turned around and asked him these questions.  He said, “Oh, it could have been a sheriff issuing a summons or it could have been they were trapping a cat…”… pretty off-the-cuff answers.  So I said, “Well, we did have some incidents last summer with vandalism and we were just a little concerned if there was something going on.”  He never answered my question.  So I thanked him, I told him my name and asked him for his name, and I drove into town then to run errands since I wasn’t going to stop at the sheriff’s department since I had just spoken with him.  When I looked in my rear-view mirror, having just rounded the curve, I noticed he was following me.

“How far did he follow you?”

He followed me to the stop sign at a crossroads, about a mile and a half from where he and I visited.  Then I went straight and he took a left, and that was it.

“Do you think things are OK now?

Yes, but I’m always watching.

“Did you ever get to meet Darren Huff?”

I did.  Darren was a very warm person.  I was impressed; he led us in prayer, and he was very easy to talk to.  He was a very wholesome person.

“What is your opinion of the fact that he is sitting in a federal prison right now?” [Editor's Note:  The question was asked prior to Huff's sentencing, which occurred on May 15, 2012.]

I just don’t understand why he’s there.  It doesn’t make sense, and it’s heartbreaking, really.  These are people who are good people, trying to expose corruption in our justice system, and now they’re paying a price.  It’s not right. It’s very sad.

The Chattanooga Times Free Press has recently reported on corruption within the Tenth Judicial District, in which the Monroe County courthouse is located and where the grand jury foreman had served for 28 consecutively.  The newspaper’s reports now say that undue influence by the  grand jury foreman in McMinn County, also in the same district, has been alleged by two grand jurors along with prosecutorial misconduct.

Huff and Fitzpatrick were objecting to prosecutorial misconduct, judicial corruption, and a grand jury foreman who had served almost three decades in violation of state law.  “If the Chattanooga Times Free Press had acted then, chances are better than even that Darren Huff would be walking around now as a patriot saying, ‘We did the right thing,’” Fitzpatrick commented.  “The same people who called Darren Huff a ‘domestic terrorist’ without doing any investigation into what happened on the 20th of April have the temerity to report on the corruption now.”

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