Editorial: Sept. 16, 2009 — What died in 2008?

by John Charlton

It’s been little more than 10 months since the 2008 Presidential Elections, and for even the casual observer a lot has changed in America.

When you arrive at middle-age, you are naturally inclined to look back at your life and consider where you’ve been headed.

When I look back at America, I see that a lot has changed in the last year:  much more than perhaps we realize, if we concentrate on the issues of the present 24hrs in which we live.

To this extent it is very useful to enumerate what’s been lost and what’s been gained.

What died in 2008?

1. The first thing that died in 2008, was the Free Press.  This is so obvious it would be mundane to give examples.  But it seems to be that the Free Press committed suicide; there was no question of a homicide.

Why did the Free Press commit suicide?  I think there are 2 main issues:  the first, the latent and diffusive marxist ideologues in the journalism profession, put there and nurtured there through the state policy of the U.S.S.R. to infiltrate the schools of journalism in America, and to promote societal collapse from within, by promoting the break down of morals — an objective shared by Freemasonry internationally.  Someone with Marxist credentials, before all else, would serve the agenda of these ideologues.

Second, in particular, we cannot forget the war that has been waged in America in the last decade, in particular, against marriage; the successes and failures to defend it; and the frustration of the progressivists and anti-christian forces in this country to get their agenda advanced.  I believe they became convinced that they needed one of theirs in the White House no matter what; someone who would steam-roll over constitutional rights, to pervert the nation.

For these 2 reasons, once the Press saw their man in Barack Obama, they wilfully stripped themselves of the name “Free” and pledged their unswerving fealty to him, even to the point of running rough-shod over Hilary Clinton’s aspirations.

2. The second thing that died in 2008 was common sense.  No matter what your objections to the policies or deeds of the Bush administration, no amount of disagreement could reasonably lead to abandoning common sense and electing a nobody, who hides his past, and calls for radical change, yet refuses to define this openly; and who is tied to radical Islam, Marxism, the Chicago mob, and internationalists with at best dubious credentials.

3. The third thing that died in 2008, was the sense of civic duty.  Too many Americans stayed home and did not vote; they believed that if there were no choices pleasing entirely to them, better not to vote and risk someone less pleasing get into office; they forgot, willfully, that their duty is to protect the nation at the ballot box.  They put personal preferences before civic duty.

4. The fourth thing that died in 2008, was the integrity of public officialdom.  The Secretaries of State did not do their job to put eligible candidates on the ballot and exclude the in-eligible:  in many states a Nicaraguan citizen, who is not even a dual American citizen, was allowed on the ballots.  Judges in state and federal courts around the nation, when apprised of election irregularities, tossed cases out the door, out of sheer cowardice. Electors and Congressmen showed no interest at all in upholding the simplest terms of the Constitution.

5. The fourth thing that died in 2008, was patriotism in the Democratic and Republican Parties.  Their patriotism died when they knowingly and with forethought chose candidates who were not natural born citizens according to the standard law-dictionary definitions.  If you are going to run for office at the Federal level you have to be prepared to swear an oath of office to uphold the Constitution — if you are not even eligible for the office, you obviously have no patriotic sense left in you; and those who support you have none either.

6. The sixth thing that died in 2008, was the unity of the nation.  I say, “the unity of the nation”, because with the rise of Obamaism, and his tacit supporters in the Republican and independent parties, there is now a new center of allegiance for these folks, and it ain’t America.  For them the status quo, the dictates of Obama, the de facto power grab and usurpation, these are the foundations of law and principle, and nothing, I repeat, nothing else matters to them.  They will say anything, do anything, urge anything, and claim anything to support this new loyalty; they will ignore everything and utter the most vile things against anyone who does have their sense of divisiveness.  If a civil war breaks out, it is they who have started it, in their minds and hearts, by such a rejection of America, of truth, and of justice.

These are my personal reflections on the last year.  Note, that I have not numbered “America” or the “United States of America” among those things which have died.

America lives, and indeed, is being reborn in the midst of this crisis, as we can see in the nearly 2.5 million Tea Party patriots who poured out into D.C. and in more than 800 places round the country over the weekend.

Long live America! May She ever be free!

0 Responses to "Editorial: Sept. 16, 2009 — What died in 2008?"

  1. Harry H   Thursday, September 17, 2009 at 9:01 PM

    I agree with John Charlton’s pointed analysis, and I guess I needed his hopeful conclusion along about now. I had a chance to speak briefly at a local T.E.A. Party on Sept. 12, and recalling the patriotism of that crowd does support a positive outlook. We can’t let the evil of ObamAxelrod, Inc. rob us of our will to make things right. Keep the faith.

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